Tanning F.A.Q.'s

  • IS TANNING BAD FOR ME?

Absolutely not. It’s all about moderation and a controlled environment, such as our tanning booths. Tanning is the human body’s natural and intended response to ultraviolet light exposure. Throughout human evolution a tan has served as the body’s natural acquired protection against sunburn and overexposure. When you’re out in the sun, you’re exposed to uncontrolled amounts of multi-frequency UV rays that can cause skin damage. Having a base tan helps reduce your risk of sunburn.

  • HOW OFTEN DO I HAVE TO TAN?

Keeping your tan requires only one to three sessions per week depending what level or strength bed you use. The tanning beds at each level have stronger bulbs and require fewer visits than those in a lower level. A visit to a Mega level bed need only be done once a week, an Ultra level bed twice a week and Base level bed three times a week. It's like being in the sun at noon instead of trying to get a tan in the late afternoon. The sun isn't as strong so it takes longer.

  • WHY SHOULD I USE A TANNING LOTION?

Most indoor tanning lotions contain ingredients that will actually help your skin produce more melanin. One of these main ingredients is called L-Tyrosine. When you are exposed to ultraviolet light, your melanocyte cells start to absorb this L-tyrosine and will actually produce more melanin. When this melanin oxidizes, it turns brown. So having more melanin being produced by your body will get you more tan. Another main reason to use tanning lotions is because when you are tanning, you start sweating. Sweating this moisture out of your skin will also cause your skin to become dry. Most indoor tanning lotions have moisturizers to keep your skin moisturized even while tanning.

  • WHAT DOES TANNING HAVE TO DO WITH VITAMIN D?

Exposure to UVB from sunshine is the body’s natural way to produce vitamin D, accounting for 90 percent of vitamin D production. Dietary “supplements” are just that: Supplemental ways to produce vitamin D.

Research has shown that people who utilize indoor tanning equipment that emits UVB – which most tanning equipment does – also produce vitamin D. And studies have also shown that indoor tanning clients have higher vitamin D blood levels than non-tanners.

While the North American indoor tanning industry promotes itself as a cosmetic service, one undeniable side-effect of that cosmetic service is vitamin D production. Even though it is not necessary to develop a tan to produce vitamin D, this should be considered: Because research suggests that the risks associated with sun exposure are related to intermittent sunburns, it is credible to believe that the benefits of regular, moderate non-burning exposure outweigh the easily manageable risks associated with overexposure.